Albert Oehlen at the Serpentine

  Albert Oehlen is an exciting, not to say pugnacious, artist. One of the Neue Wilde generation that emerged in Germany in the 1980s, he is still going strong. He mixes oil painting with digital printing and collage and the result is something special. You really need to download the 35 page press pack if…

Elizabeth Peyton at Sadie Coles

    For someone of my generation the first encounter with Elizabeth Peyton’s wispy little portraits of celebrities provoked a sense of outrage: how could this possibly be serious art? I should have learnt by then that any new work which stops you in your tracks is more than likely to prove important.   Her…

Chantal Joffe at Victoria Miro Mayfair

      It comes as something of a shock to discover that all the paintings in this show are self-portraits. Her earlier works were vibrant and engaging and often seemed to be filled with sunlight. The row of faces here are gaunt and grim.   The energy apparent in the way the paint has…

Ryan Sullivan at Sadie Coles

    ‘Seeing how things change as they dry keeps me coming in every morning. I wouldn’t want to learn how to control that. It’s really important to let a painting take on its own direction.’ Ryan Sullivan received wide acclaim for his debut show In Manhattan in 2012, a response which seems set to…

Katja Seib

Katja Seib’s paintings are distinctive. She was born in Dusseldorf and graduated from the Kunstacademie in 2016. Her paintings are figurative and some are serene and dream-like (the best in my opinion), while others verge on a kind of gothic Guignol. Dream and Forgetting (image 1) shows a dark figure lying sprawled on a bed,…

Alex Katz ‘Coca Cola Girls’ at Timothy Taylor

A lot of people don’t much like the work of Alex Katz and this is understandable. There is something innately hostile about those huge abstracted faces and those perfect flowers, almost suitable for wallpaper. This work however is both smaller and easier to like. Now ninety-one, the artist has not lost any of his considerable…

Kerry James Marshall ‘History of Painting’ at David Zwirner

    Kerry James Marshall’s work is magisterial. And yet he is an easeful painter, even though blackness in America is not an easeful subject. When he began his career in the 1970s there were no black artists celebrated for their depiction of other black people. His black people are very black indeed, darker surely…